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Job Search Tip of the Week #6 (2019)

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Job Search Tip of the Week #6 (2019)

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When is Leaving a Job the Best Option?




Many people joke about “walking away from it all.” Although fantasizing about leaving your job for something better is a typical way to relieve stress, sometimes quitting is truly the best thing to do. But if you’re considering this type of change, make sure you do it in the right way. Otherwise, you might burn bridges that are vital parts of your career path.

Stay or go?

The average American spends 10.3 years at work — about 13% of a typical lifetime. That’s a significant amount of time, especially when you’re in a job you don’t enjoy.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #5 (2019)

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Can you make more money by quitting your job? Recent macroeconomic findings from the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City suggest so.

“Unlike wages of stayers, wagers of switchers are much more cyclically sensitive, as contracts signed with new employers are more likely to reflect current economic conditions,” noted economist José Mustre-del-Rio in the research report, “Following the Leaders: Wage Growth of Job Switchers.” “Historically, wage growth of switchers tracks the quits rate, suggesting that as the labor market continues to recover and the quits rate continues to rise, switchers’ wage gains should rise even further as a result of competitive pressures. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that switchers’ wage growth has been quite strong the past several quarters as the labor market continues to tighten.”

In layman’s terms? More American workers are voluntarily quitting their jobs (in fact, the number of people quitting jobs just hit an eight-year high, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics), which indicates a steadily improving labor market. And those who quit their jobs to pursue new job opportunities tend to be able to negotiate pay raises above the inflation rate and cost of living increases.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #37 (2018)

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How to Make it as a Millennial

…and Show Everyone They’re Wrong about Gen-Y and Gen-Z Workers!




How would you describe Millennials?

The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) asked that of the respondents of their behavior and attitude survey. Unsurprisingly, they found that Millennials generally perceived themselves in a more favorable manner than non-Millennials, who often referred to the former as “lazy,” “spoiled,” and “entitled.” (Survey responses depicted in visualization at right.).

Stereotypes such as these contribute to the double-digit unemployment rate of Millennials, which is consistently twice the national average. It’s important for Millennials entering the job market to be aware of the cynical attitudes many hold towards their generation and learn how to change them. Here are the 3 most common negative perceptions employers have of Gen Y and Gen Z’ers and how you can prove them wrong:

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Job Search Tip of the Week #13 (2017)

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Cultural Fit vs. Qualifications & Experience

When Hiring, Which Comes Out on Top?




While researchers Dokko, Wilk, and Rothbard were investigating how career history affects job performance, a senior human resource manager told them, “We tried to hire from our competitors and paid a premium for the experience but [those hires] were the least successful.”

How could this be? Dokko et. al determined that culture varied so vastly across companies, that some of the most experienced hires seemed to require retraining to complete previously mastered tasks. In fact, poor cultural fit appeared to completely eliminate all the good that came from having the ideal skill set. That HR manager found out the hard way that prior experience doesn’t necessarily predict future job performance.

“You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”

Why do some tech firms prefer to hire software developers who have a history of job hopping over those who’ve been using the same technologies in the same environment for a long time? Perhaps it’s because job hopping is an indicator of social skill and cultural adaptability.

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