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Job Search Tip of the Week #33 (2018)

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Want More Career Flexibility?

A Staffing Firm Can Help



Are you looking for more flexibility in your work? Do you wish you could travel the world or work outside the regular nine-to-five? Technology is making it possible for many “digital nomads” to do just that. But many such pros — like Piero Toffanin, Greg Jorgensen, and Clayton Cornell — warn that landing work can be a challenge for those whose work isn’t tied to a particular location.

For aspiring digital nomads, staffing firms can offer a solution. Working with a staffing firm can open up opportunities that provide the flexibility to work part-time, relocate, or take time off to travel or work on other projects. And because firms such as Chase Technology Consultants (CTC) have longstanding relationships with client employers, they can help assuage employers’ concerns with flexible work arrangements.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #32 (2018)

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Is Telecommuting Here to Stay?



Job seekers are increasingly considering telecommuting as a must-have benefit, and even employers are warming to its ability to boost productivity, worker satisfaction, and cost efficiency. What’s behind the growing popularity of working from home, and how can a well-structured telecommuting option benefit both employees and employers?

Workers want to telecommute

Telecommuting is becoming more common in the U.S. workforce: 24% of U.S. workers telecommute at least part-time each week. According to data compiled by Inc. magazine, the practice can save money for both employers and employees:

  • Telecommuters save anywhere from $2,000 to $7,000 annually on transportation, clothes, child care, and eating out.
  • Organizations that allow remote work save up to $11,000 annually per employee, primarily on office space, furnishings, maintenance, parking, and phone services.

In addition, 79% of workers want to work remotely, at least part of the time. And they’re willing to work harder to prove themselves: Nearly twice as many telecommuters (53%) work more than 40 hours per week, compared with only 28% of their office-bound colleagues.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #31 (2018)

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Work or Wander?

Why choose? Digital nomads get to do both.



By now, most of us have read the statistics on the millennial generation. These younger workers, estimated to be the majority of the U.S. workforce, place a premium on flexibility and freedom in the workplace. One way that companies can attract and support millennials is to consider more fluid work arrangements. By empowering “digital nomads” with a work-from-anywhere experience, organizations and employees can both benefit.

The new worker

Forbes notes that 60% of millennials stay three years or less in any single job. One reason for this turnover is that many younger workers are seeking a “work-life balance” that includes fewer working hours, flexible schedules, travel opportunities, and job variety.

When companies can’t accommodate these needs, millennials are apt to jump ship. With a reported average cost of $15,000 to $25,000 to replace each lost employee, organizations need to make the workplace more attractive to this hard-to-retain generation.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #30 (2018)

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Outdoor Coding and Living Small

The Story of a Professional Outdoor Coder




Ever considered the life of a digital nomad?

Software developer Piero Toffanin coded his way across the United States for a year, documenting his travels and tribulations in his blog
Outdoor Coding Stories. Fortunately, we caught him at a time when he didn’t have spotty Internet (“8 Things You Should Know About Coding on the Road“), and got him to take a break from his programming and exploring adventures to answer a few questions for our CareerJuice readers about his outdoor coding experience.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #29 (2018)

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How to Ace Your First-Round (or Really, Just About Any) Interview

Think Like an Interviewer – Q1 through Q19



Knowing why hiring managers ask certain questions puts you in the best position to answer them. That’s why every week for the past few months we’ve tackled a different one of the 19 most common interview questions, revealing the meaning behind it and walking you through what interviewers want to hear.

Ready to test your ability to think like an interviewer and tackle some of the most common – yet difficult – interview questions? Get started below! And don’t forget to click on the links to double-check that your answer’s the best it can be (remember, some responses elicit better impressions of you than others):

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Job Search Tip of the Week #28 (2018)

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5 Steps to Conquer Any Networking Event

How to Impress While Networking [INFOGRAPHIC]



At a networking event, have you ever:

  • Felt intimidated or uncomfortable in a room full of strangers?
  • Been so nervous you made some awkward moves going for the handshake?
  • Worried about saying or doing the wrong thing?
  • Questioned whether you reacted appropriately to something someone said or did?
  • Struggled to remember names? What was said just moments before? Conversations you had with someone you’d met previously?
  • Stuck someone’s business card in your pocket and lost it seconds later? (There’s an app for that!)
  • Gotten nervous when asked to talk about yourself?
  • Avoided situations where you could become the center of (someone’s) attention, aka “wallflowered it?”

…and then second-guessed yourself after it was all over?

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Job Search Tip of the Week #26 (2018)

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I don’t think it should be socially acceptable for people to say they are “bad with names.” No one is bad with names. That is not a real thing. Not knowing people’s names isn’t a neurological condition; it’s a choice. You choose not to make learning people’s names a priority. It’s like saying, “Hey, a disclaimer about me: I’m rude.”

– Mindy Kaling, Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?



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Job Search Tip of the Week #25 (2018)

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How to Ace Your First-Round (or Really, Just About Any) Interview

Think Like an Interviewer – Q19



Of the 19 most commonly asked questions, this is one we’ve heard at every interview: “Why do you want to leave your current position?”

Interviewers ask this question in the interests of cultural fit and employee retention — they want to make sure you’ll be satisfied in your new position and won’t walk out after six months. It’s a win-win for you to be honest!

That said, whether you’ve decided to leave your current company for personal or professional reasons, it’s important to keep your response positive and focused on the future.

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Job Search Tip of the Week #24 (2018)

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How to Ace Your First-Round (or Really, Just About Any) Interview

Think Like an Interviewer – Q18



According to a survey from the Ethics Resource Center (ERC), nearly half of all U.S. workers witness unethical behavior at least once a year. “It’s just part of being employed,” said Patricia Harned, PhD, ERC president. “You’re going to observe some kind of misconduct on the job. One of the biggest challenges is having to figure out what to do after you’ve observed it.”

Since moral and ethical dilemmas are common at work, your interviewer wants to know how you’d respond in such situations. That’s why “Tell me about a time you faced an ethical dilemma” is one of the most commonly asked interview questions — so whatever you do, don’t say, “I’ve never been put in a position where my values were tested,” because that’s almost certainly untrue.

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